Articles

 

Liquidators’ appointment valid despite breach of deemed consent procedure (Cash Generator Ltd v Fortune and others)

David Oliver, a consultant solicitor with the insolvency and business turnaround team at Verisona Law, examines an Insolvency and Companies Court decision that non-compliance with the statutory provisions for the appointment of liquidators did not invalidate the first and second respondents’ appointments as joint liquidators of three companies.

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Employment law updates in 2018

2017 was a busy year in the world of Employment Law. Among the legal headlines were the removal of employment fees and the beginning of what was to become a national consultation on the pay gap between men and women.

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Dealing with employee theft

According to a poll commissioned by office-furniture supplier Kit Out My Office, more than two-thirds of UK office workers have admitted to stealing from their employers and colleagues at some time during their careers. With the cost of stolen items averaging at £12.50 and an estimated 15 million workers having confessed to employee theft, the cost to UK employers adds up to a whopping £190 million each year.

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Contact with your Children – how to settle your differences without going to court

Whether you are married or living together, splitting up can be an emotional time. If there are children involved, the feelings of hurt and anger can be magnified. However, this is the time when your children need you to be at your most level-headed.

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What does intestate mean for you?

October 2014 saw the biggest changes in probate law’s history come into effect. While the overhaul meant no real difference to those with minimal assets, for the partners of those who died without making a will and who have more assets, it meant significant change. The change gave a surviving spouse the right to a much bigger share of their deceased spouse’s estate than was previously the case.

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Common law myths – your rights as an unmarried couple

In today’s society, it’s increasingly common for couples to live together as ‘common law’ spouses or co-habitees rather than getting married. The danger of this is that many co-habitees believe they have the same protection as a common law husband or wife, which simply isn’t true. In reality, you have very little protection as an unmarried couple should the relationship end or if one of you dies.

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Voluntary Workers – Their rights and your responsibilities as an employer

A volunteer is anyone who carries out unpaid work for a charity, fundraising body or voluntary organisation. If you hire volunteers to work for your organisation, there are certain things you need to be aware of. If you happen to be a volunteer, it pays to know your rights, too. We’ve outlined some of the legalities to help you both stay on the right side of the law.

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Firefighter ruling sparks new heat for employers

The standby arrangements for Belgium’s volunteer firefighters are set to cause new headaches for employers with workers who are paid flat rates for time on-call or when sleeping in the workplace, with a judgement that will affect companies across the European Union.

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Patently unfair – What are your legal rights if somebody has stolen your idea or product?

The definition of intellectual property is: ‘any type of intangible property that is a result of creativity’. This covers designs, logos, and artistic or literary, works as well as inventions. If you suspect another person or business of infringing on your intellectual property, you could take legal action.

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What impact will the Worboys judgment have for victims of serious crime?

Two victims of John Worboys have won their claims for compensation from the Metropolitan Police after the Supreme Court ruled that their treatment by police breached their human rights.

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